Xc Title
User:Guest
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Wesley Murch  All flights
National League 2024
Flight type image
Turnpoint Flight on a Paraglider
Club
XClent
Glider
Niviuk Icepeak X-One
Date
17th June 2024
Start
12:39
Finish
17:22
Duration
4hrs 43mins
Takeoff
Milk Hill White Horse
Landing
Orwell
Coords
Takeoff
51.37338, -1.85910
Start
51.37465, -1.86217
TP1
51.57512, -1.36205
TP2
51.83982, -1.09665
TP3
52.03437, -0.59608
Finish
52.13700, -0.01937
Landing
52.13683, -0.02017
Distances and Score
Leg 1
41.29k
Leg 2
34.70k
Leg 3
40.67k
Leg 4
41.15k
Total
157.81k
Score
157.8
Open Distance
Total
152.9k
Filename
Use full pilot name
Download
Validated
Yes
Flight map
Notes

This map gives an overview of the flight, using the turnpoints to plot the track.

Use the for a detailed map and flight track.

Duration 0:00   Takeoff Distance 0
Controls
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Highlights
Track data
Time: No data
Height:
Climb:
Speed:
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Units
Height: metres
Climb: m/sec
Speed: km/h
Distance: km
chart
Notes

Climb and Speed averaged over 4 second intervals.

These values may be lower than those shown by a flight instrument, which has access to continuous raw data.

Red values indicate suspect data, because the tracklog contains invalid points.

Metric units are used for all chart data, except for Height which is shown in feet.

Height   -   GPS data
Maximum Height
[15:04:21]
5315 ft
Lowest Save
[15:51:14]
669 ft
Takeoff Height
[12:38:19]
843 ft
Landing Height
[17:22:44]
10 ft
Total Ascent 39334 ft
Height Gain
Above Takeoff 4472 ft
Maximum 4491 ft
Low Point
[12:38:45]
823 ft
High Point
as Maximum Height
5315 ft
Units
Climb   -   Pressure data
Maximum Climb
[15:03:14]
4.8 m/s
Minimum Climb
[14:01:43]
-4.3 m/s
Units
Speed
Maximum Speed
[14:01:11]
71.1 km/h
Average Speed
around course
33.4 km/h
Average Speed
over track length
45.0 km/h
Units
Tracklog
Flight Duration 4hrs 44mins
Track Points 16704
Recording Interval 1 secs
Statistics Interval 4 secs
Track Length 213.2 km
Invalid Positions
[< 1%]
5
Units
Flight instrument
Type Flyskyhy
Model 8.2.3
Firmware 8.2.3
Notes

Climb and Speed averaged over 4 second intervals.

These values may be lower than those shown by a flight instrument, which has access to continuous raw data.

Red values indicate suspect data, because the tracklog contains invalid points.

Average Speed around course is measured from Start to Finish points.

Track Length is the cumulative distance between track points from Takeoff to Landing.

You can change the default units displayed - see the Options page.

"Perhaps a lunatic was simply a minority of one" - Orwell.

Having attempted to fly yesterday on no sleep from a 12 hour night shift and it being a crap day, I was pleased to see another opportunity in today.

I met Pete and Ken at Parkway at 08.30 and we set off to Milk Hill where I had arranged to meet Alex, Kirsty and Tom and of course knowing many others would also be there. I wanted to be on TO early as I like to faf a bit and talk nonsense once I have my kit ready (I'm really not fast at getting ready and I don't socialise much until it is)

I walked over to the spur with Kirsty and Charles N and already the sky looked decent (09.25) with kites thermalling and the cackle of roaming ravens as they stopped to take occasional turns in lifting air.

"Let's not be too eager today" said Kirsty and I agreed, we had been straight off the hill a few times this season and it has meant either catching the first thermal and climbing out but being slow or having to wait around takeoff in climbs for the day to get going.

After the walk over we met Tom who was sunbathing (he'll say he wasn't) had our cuddles and hellos and then got on with the faf.

The sky looked Greta and by 10 there was a good group of pilots on the spur just itching to form a gaggle, there was occasion sighting of a wing up flying the bowl but nothing really exciting.

Alex kites his wing a bit and then was off and slowly climbing, I got off too and had a few turns but was soon top landing and then the waiting began. We sat on the hill for hours after that. Craig A got off and gained enough height that he could play around a bit before getting a climb and disappearing, we however, sat and watched pilots went to the bottom of side landed as they tempted to stay up on the farts of larks and whispers of bumblebees.

Around 12 o'clock (I can't be bothered to check the time on my instrument) we saw a gaggle form and climb at the spur, nothing epic but certainly the best we had witnessed, this was signs the day had changed and with that a few went for the glide… Someone on a Qlight got a nice little pocket of lift so unashamedly I pimped off of them and the climb began. Pilots left the hill like leaf litter in a strong breeze but the climbs were still few and far between, as I climbed out with Ben D, Kirsty and others, many were soon back top landing.

We had set the goal at Bury St Edmunds, 208km, it would require some cross winding but that just makes it more technical, what makes it more technical is the shit storm of airspace MATZ, ATZ, 3500, 4500, DZ etc… So we knew we had to get off the hill and push North early in a westerly, just to get past this crux.

Cross winding wasn't particularly hard as the day was actually pretty good once away from the hill, BASE was still low at about 3500 but climbs were there and the clouds were great. Myself, Kirsty and Ben formed a great little team and on the radio we clarified our route to the North and then set about a long, slow jaunt cross wind. "Perhaps a lunatic was simply a minority of one" - Orwell.

Having attempted to fly yesterday on no sleep from a 12 hour night shift and it being a crap day, I was pleased to see another opportunity in today.

I met Pete and Ken at Parkway at 08.30 and we set off to Milk Hill where I had arranged to meet Alex, Kirsty and Tom and of course knowing many others would also be there. I wanted to be on TO early as I like to faf a bit and talk nonsense once I have my kit ready (I'm really not fast at getting ready and I don't socialise much until it is)

I walked over to the spur with Kirsty and Charles N and already the sky looked decent (09.25) with kites thermalling and the cackle of roaming ravens as they stopped to take occasional turns in lifting air.

"Let's not be too eager today" said Kirsty and I agreed, we had been straight off the hill a few times this season and it has meant either catching the first thermal and climbing out but being slow or having to wait around takeoff in climbs for the day to get going.

After the walk over we met Tom who was sunbathing (he'll say he wasn't) had our cuddles and hellos and then got on with the faf.

The sky looked Greta and by 10 there was a good group of pilots on the spur just itching to form a gaggle, there was occasion sighting of a wing up flying the bowl but nothing really exciting.

Alex kites his wing a bit and then was off and slowly climbing, I got off too and had a few turns but was soon top landing and then the waiting began. We sat on the hill for hours after that. Craig A got off and gained enough height that he could play around a bit before getting a climb and disappearing, we however, sat and watched pilots went to the bottom of side landed as they tempted to stay up on the farts of larks and whispers of bumblebees.

Around 12 o'clock (I can't be bothered to check the time on my instrument) we saw a gaggle form and climb at the spur, nothing epic but certainly the best we had witnessed, this was signs the day had changed and with that a few went for the glide… Someone on a Qlight got a nice little pocket of lift so unashamedly I pimped off of them and the climb began. Pilots left the hill like leaf litter in a strong breeze but the climbs were still few and far between, as I climbed out with Ben D, Kirsty and others, many were soon back top landing.

We had set the goal at Bury St Edmunds, 208km, it would require some cross winding but that just makes it more technical, what makes it more technical is the shit storm of airspace MATZ, ATZ, 3500, 4500, DZ etc… So we knew we had to get off the hill and push North early in a westerly, just to get past this crux. After about 2 hours we had done 50km, 50km… Honestly that's slow. I'm sure exciting things happened but I've forgotten them with the torment. We pushed on and there was some bits of Kirsty getting low, like really low and fighting back, then Ben had a go and did a Greta as well to get back up with us but all in all, it wasn't particularly difficult, just technical. We were treated by an acrobatic display from a sailplane as it came near and waggled it's wings "That's Hugh I reckon, I said on the radio" 5 minutes later the glider returned and did a full loop in front of us and passed by, I started pumping the air with both hands and shout "Yeah man" (for my own benefit) before getting back on the radio "That's got to be bloody Hugh"

After that excitement it was back to flying and discussing the airspace. We pushed on but I had gotten a bit Infront now as Kirsty and Ben had got low so we kept in contact and Kirsty made a jump to get to me but came in low so I waited going in and out of cloud for her to climb. However, at 4000' I was getting 2.5ms climbs I didn't want and at 2000' Kirsty was getting nothing, she would soon have her revenge however as the tables turned and I was down to about 500feet and she came over my head at 3500 and I was the one battling. I managed to get back up but Kirsty had to push on. The front had come down from the north and the sky was now looking pretty horrible just a couple of KM from us with funnel clouds and rain visible. The ground had gone to shade and we were now just trying to out run it and get back into the sunshine.

The front was faster than me and I was constantly chasing sunshine like and ass after a carrot inches from its nose. I got a bit of a climb though and managed to get back up and Kirsty and I decided we would head to Cambridge and the easy retrieve. This itself looked ominous with the only good air being South of our line but we pushed on. I pushed further south and chased pockets of sunshine but unfortunately the day was done, I flew through a couple of 0.3 that I should have worked really but I kept thinking 'if I can get to that sunshine I'll be alright' and with that I flew past the offerings that maybe would have gotten me the extra couple of KM to an easy retrieve.

I landed and packed up, walked to the road and after about 10 mins of waiting with thumb out I was picked up by a hangover pilot called Richard who lives near Pershore. A gentleman of a man who dropped me to Foxton from my landing place of Orwell (one of fave authors) qe exchanged names and he said "Oh you are The Wez" I felt it wise not to press this and just laughed. It was lovely to meet him and I hope he had a good journey home.

Now sat in the train after coming through London for the 4th time this season and thinking, Wow the novelty of the Tube wears off fast. Unfortunately work again tomorrow…

Oh P. S I think I hadn't routed my pee tune through the bottom of my harness so there's a good chance my ecstasy enduring wee after 3 hours filled my harness with piss. I thought that may cheer some up.

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